The Lost Explorer

The Lost Explorer

Manufacturer:
Simon & Schuster

ISBN:
0684872498

Retail Price:
$24.00

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Book Description


On June 8, 1924, George Leigh Mallory and Andrew "Sandy" Irvine were last seen climbing toward the summit of Mount Everest. Clouds soon closed around them, and they vanished into history. Ever since, mountaineers have wondered whether they reached the summit.

On May 1, 1999, Conrad Anker, one of the world's strongest mountaineers, discovered Mallory's body lying facedown, frozen into the scree and naturally mummified at 27,000 feet on Everest's North Face. The condition of the body, as well as the artifacts found with Mallory, are important clues in determining his fate. Seventeen days later, Anker free-climbed the Second Step, a 90-foot sheer cliff that is the single hardest obstacle on the north ridge. The first expedition known to have conquered the Second Step, a Chinese team in 1975, had tied a ladder to the cliff, leaving unanswered the question of whether Mallory could have climbed it in 1924. Anker's climb was the first test since Mallory's of the cliff's true difficulty. In treacherous conditions, Anker led teammate Dave Hahn from the Second Step to the summit.

Reflecting on the climb, Anker explains why he thinks Mallory and Irvine failed to make the summit, but at the same time he expresses his awe at Mallory's achievement with the primitive equipment of the time. Stunningly handsome and charismatic, Mallory charmed everyone who met him during his lifetime and continues to fascinate mountaineers today.

The Lost Explorer is the remarkable story of this extraordinarily talented man and of the equally talented modern climber who spearheaded a discovery that may ultimately help solve the mystery of Mallory's disappearance.

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On June 8, 1924, George Leigh Mallory and Andrew "Sandy" Irvine were last seen climbing toward the summit of Mt. Everest. Clouds soon closed around them, and they vanished into history. Ever since, mountaineers have wondered whether they reached the summit, twenty-nine years before Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay. On May 1, 1999, Conrad Anker, one of the world's strongest mountaineers, discovered Mallory's body, frozen and naturally mummified at 27,000 feet on Everest's north face. The condition of the body, as well as the "artifacts" found with Mallory, are important clues in determining his fate. Seventeen days later Anker free-climbed the Second Step, a ninety-foot sheer cliff that is the single hardest obstacle on the north ridge. Anker's climb was the first test since Mallory's of the cliff's true difficulty. From the Second Step, Anker led teammate Dave Hahn to the summit under treacherous conditions. Reflecting on the climb, Anker explains why he thinks Mallory and Irvine failed to make the summit, but also expresses his awe for Mallory's achievement with the primitive equipment of the time. Handsome, charismatic, and a climber of legendary gracefulness, Mallory continues to fascinate mountaineers today. The Lost Explorer is the remarkable story of this extraordinary man, and of the equally talented modern climber who spearheaded a discovery that may help solve the mystery of Mallory's disappearance.
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Brand new, factory sealed, never played, AUDIO Cassette/4 cassettes/Simon&Schuster Audio division/Audio Book Club. 4.5 hours, abridged. Read by Jeffrey Demunn and Michael McGlone with an introduction by co-author of the book David Roberts. On June 8, 19
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The Lost Explorer Specs:
Product NameThe Lost Explorer
ManufacturerSimon & Schuster
Retail Price $24.00
Specifications 
TitleThe Lost Explorer, The Lost Explorer : Finding Mallory on Mount Everest
ISBN0684872498
Author(s)David Roberts, Conrad Anker, Jeffrey Demunn, Michael McGlone, McGlone Michael
Release Date1999-11-01
FormatAudio Cassette
Num of Pages5
Num. of Items4
EAN9780684872490

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Latest 6 Reviews
Here is what people are saying about the The Lost Explorer
5 Star Rating  "Lost Explorer: Finding Mallory on Mt. Everest" 
- Reviewed By An Amazon User
I am a math and science teacher at a high school. I found that the book was very informative, and opened my eyes to the many problems that mountain climbers have. We live in the mountains, and a formidable solid granite rock called "Devil's Slide" is near us.

George Mallory made many mistakes in/on his fourth attempt to climb Everest. And, from the description of his attempts to summit the mountain may not have been able to do so.

Thanks for the book, Jeff Campbell

 
5 Star Rating  "A wonderful book" 
- Reviewed By An Amazon User from Sudbury, MA USA
George Leigh Mallory was probably the greatest mountaineer ever to scale a mountain. This book does him justice. Though we'll never know if Mallory and Irvine actually made it to the top of Everest, the circumstantial evidence I think points to the probability that they did in fact do that. When Conrad Anker and his team discovered Mallory's remains, they discovered that Mallory's goggles were secure in his back pack. This means that Mallory was mountaineering after the sun had set. One of Mallory's teammates reported that he had seen Mallory and Irvine on the second step, less than 500 feet from the peak, in the early afternoon when the sun was bright. Thus, it seems very probable that Mallory and Irvine made it to the top and, during their descent, took off their goggles because of the increasing darkness. If anyone could have made it to the top using the inferior equipment avaiable in the early 1920s, it was Mallory. Given the fact that he was within 500 feet of the top of Everest in the early afternoon makes it more than likely that Mallory and Irvine were the first to conquer Everest.
 
5 Star Rating  "As Close to the Real Truth as One Could Imagine" 
- Reviewed By An Amazon User from Boston, MA
This story is told in a dual format style; Anker uses the 1st person and Roberts the third, recounting the history of the 1924 British expedition, and the loss of Mallory and Irvine. The backgrounds of both these hardy early climbers is investigated in great detail, including several earlier scouting expeditions.
The book was a fabulous read and I finished it in two sittings. I was interested in the subject, having seen the BBC/NOVA TV production and heard the comments of other climbers on the discovery of the lost Mallory.
I was impressed on the multi-points-of-view taken by both co-authors, and the discussions of what the range of possibilities were for the results that were discovered. At the same time, there are many interesting yarns recounted by both writers, themselves very strong and sensitive adventurers.
If you are going to read only one book on the subject, let it be this one!!
 
5 Star Rating  "Concise and fascinating" 
- Reviewed By An Amazon User from Caldwell, NJ USA
This is an interesting, concise account of the 1999 discovery of George Mallory, possibly the first to climb Mt. Everest.

In 1924 Everest veteran Mallory and his promising junior partner Andrew Irvine famously disappeared some 1000 feet below the summit. Did they reach it before they perished, 29 years before Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay? In 1999, Conrad Anker of the Mallory and Irvine Research Expedition found Mallory. Yet the great question remains.

In this book Anker and fellow climber David Roberts discuss Mallory's life, the discovery, what Mallory and Irvine mean to them. Anker recounts his attempt to replicate a key part of Mallory's climb. Roberts' biography of Mallory alternates with Anker's account of the events of 1999.

After finding Mallory, Anker's team removed key items he was carrying, which were both clues and historic artifacts. They also published photographs of part of the body. Some called this desecration. Anker responds.

Interestingly, Anker and his collegues all initially thought they had found Irvine.

Mallory's camera was absent, much to everyone's disappointment. A few days later, Anker and his partners assisted in a rescue. Afterwards, fresh snow obscured the search region, scrapping a planned search for Irvine and the camera.

Roberts discusses Mallory's somewhat bohemian youth, his attitudes about bottled oxygen, his prior climbing achievements, and his famous quote: "Because it's there". A full chapter is devoted to the 1924 expedition, discussing why Mallory chose to climb with Irvine, Teddy Norton and David Somervell's record climb just before Mallory's attempt, and Noel Odell's tantalizing last sight of the lost pair.

The book concludes with Anker's account of his own summit climb, his near-disastrous descent, and his best speculation about George Mallory and Andrew Irvine's fate. His reluctant conclusion: the key obstacle called the Second Step was most likely unclimbable under 1924 conditions, the two turned back there if not earlier, and they fell to their deaths descending as fresh snow fell.

This fascinating book is dedicated to Mallory and Irvine, who both authors greatly admire regardless of the exact events of June 8, 1924.
 
5 Star Rating  "Even better to HEAR Anker tell it..." 
- Reviewed By Anonymous
They found George Mallory's body on Everest. I had the pleasure of hearing this story- before I read the book- from Conrad Anker himself at a Wilderness Medical Conference this past year. What an amazing story. Some have been critical of the handling of the remains and possessions but there is no doubt in my mind after meeting the man that the intention was to 'do the right thing'. It's just that the right thing isn't so clear in this situation. What do you do when you find the remains of a legend in an environment as inhospitable as Mt. Everest? The profits or a portion thereof of book sales at the conference were donated to charity-the Alex Lowe foundation and the possessions recovered, as I recall, were turned over to family members or historical societies- it's not like Anker is selling them on Ebay. Also, maybe there is some pride or ego in the discovery but rightfully so. I think it would be hard to accurately describe the events without sounding a little boastful, although again, Mr. Anker seems like quite an unassuming man and I didn't get that impression in person. The book is interesting and a quick easy read to gain historical perspective about George Mallory, Sandy Irvine and company and the early exploration of Everest and about the discovery of Mallory's body which is monumental in mountaineering circles. In fact, I think I'm going to go read it again.
...just some thoughts, not a full review of the book...
 
5 Star Rating  "The Lost Explorer" 
- Reviewed By An Amazon User from Harrisburg, PA USA
Quite recently I picked up a book titled "Ghosts of Everest: The Search for Mallory and Irvine." A fascinating book, extensively documented, the story Mallory's final attempt upon Everest caught my imagination, as did the man himself.

While "Lost Explorer" may not have all of the details about the 1924 expedition, or lengthy lists of sponsors for the expeditions, it has something that I found lacking in "Ghosts of Everest." Anker, while maybe not the most eloquent of writers, provides readers with an intensely personal view of his experiences. His version of the story seems altogether more truthful and honest than "Ghosts of Everest" which takes a more picturesque view of the events. Anker goes on to tell about a harrowing, high-altitude rescue and his own summit of Everest. Also, "Lost Explorer", though David Roberts's writing, provides the reader with a more intimate view of Mallory's life.

"Lost Explorer" is a passionate, fascinating, and, most importantly, personal story about extraordinary men (both past and present) and their journey on the same mountain.

 
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